Archive for ‘Diversity’

March 16, 2011

Reducing the “Becoming Gentlemen” Affect by Increasing Female Law Faculty

by Angela N. Johnson

Carlson’s review of Lanie Guinier’s  “Becoming Gentlemen” argues that the alienation of women and minors continues in law school and that institutions must focus on institutional acceptance and absorption of diversity in place of the imposition of a “one-size-fits-all” mentality (Carlson 1998, 317).  Additionally, Guinnier’s “latest work provides a timely contribution to the defense of affirmative action policies in law school faculty hiring decisions” (Carlson 1998, 318). However, Carlson’s review of “Becoming Gentlemen” “concludes that while Guinier’s findings are valauble, law schools need to first focus on providing women with equal access to desirable faculty positions before her recommendations can become a meaningful reality” (Carlson 1998, 318).

Hypothesis: In order for women law students to achieve equal experiences in law school, law schools must increases the proportion of women faculty because they will serve as mentors to women law students. To do this, affirmative action programs which have recently come under attack, must be defended.

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March 14, 2011

Legal Education Reform, Diversity, and Access to Justice

by Angela N. Johnson

Anderson’s article, “A Legal Education Prospectus,”  is in response to three reports in reforming legal education: The MacCrate Report, Best Practices, and the Carnegie Report.  It is Anderson’s belief that while all three reports provide helpful information and ideas for reform, none examine the grave crisis in lack of legal representation to those belonging to minority and disadvantaged groups and how law schools hold the power (by admitting more diverse students) to change the legal profession crisis.  This article is focused on minorities’ lack of presence in law school transferring to a lack of non-lawyer minorities’ lack of legal representation and access to justice.  However, parallels are drawn to the issue between minorities and women, such as the fact that both students of color and female students are often attracted to experiential learning opportunities and may better flourish in a curriculum that integrates doctrinal theory and practical skills and that such experiential and clinical courses aid the poor and disenfranchised which furthers the access to legal help to those in need.   

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