Archive for ‘Prosecutor’

April 5, 2011

1989 Article Reveals Little Change for Women in Private Practice, yet Prosecutor as a Women-Friendly Role

by Angela N. Johnson

According to Raggi’s 1989 article, women lawyers are not achieving positions of professional prominence in the private sector “in nearly the percentages that their numbers and class rank would indicate” (Raggi 1989, 975).  The current inequality of women lawyers in the private sector is similar to Raggi’s article, written back in 1989.  It is discouraging to realize not much has changed for women lawyers in the private sector.  However, Raggi reports in 1989 that women were well-represented as the best and brightest prosecuting attorneys in New York.  Women achieve equality in prosecuting? This is astonishing when taken into account the need for prosecutors to be among the toughest and most aggressive lawyers who must prove themselves to their “clients,” (the government investigators and police).  Though Raggi’s article is mostly anecdotal (and written 22 years ago) it provides a great snapshot of at least one woman’s experience as a prosecutor. For example, Raggi notes that when she left the prosecutor’s office in 1986, every unit in her office had been, at one time or another, headed by a woman Id. at 976.  Additionally, during her years as a prosecutor, she “encountered virtually no gender discrimination” Id. at 975. Why might this be?  Raggi credits the fact the employer is the government and required to enforce a wide variety of laws enacted to ensure equal opportunity for women.  Many women lawyers turn to prosecuting to avoid the less-than-welcoming environments in other areas of practice.

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December 29, 2010

Women Lawyers Discuss Their Role in 1987

by Angela N. Johnson

ABA Journal May 1987

I enjoyed this 1987 edition of the ABA Journal which included articles on “senior lawyers shaking their heads about those young lawyers” and “how computers made us better lawyers – what the new technology can do for you.”  Most useful was the article, “Superwoman is Alive and Well” in which Yates and Benson Goldberg interview five women who discuss the joys and jolts of practicing law.  This article is useful despite being rather dated because it is written at a turning point in the legal profession when women are becoming widely accepted but harassment, discrimination, and inequality are still commonly feared.

Diane Geraghty, an associate professor of law at Loyola University feels fortunate to have graduated law school in the ‘70’s.  Geraghty states, “If you talk to people who graduated 10 years before we did, they knew what real discrimination was” (Yates and Goldberg 18).  She thanks the civil rights movement and a critical mass of women who pushed to open up the profession to include women.  Miriam Miquelon a business litigator, “It’s changed, but in the beginning you had to make sure you didn’t come off as a hysterical female and that you could be as businesslike as everyone else.  And once you were recognized as competent, the client could get past the sexuality issue, and accept you as his counsel” (Yates and Goldberg 18).  For Patricia Bobb, a graduate of Notre Dame Law School and a former Cook County prosecuting attorney, she decided “Early on that I would develop a tough exterior and a good sense of humor” (Yates and Goldberg 18).  She recalls working with “probably the most macho group of men in the world – not just the state’s attorneys but the cops” and how her humor fit nicely with her personality in such a way she never had problems with harassment.  However, Candace Fabri, who worked for the U.S. Attorney’s office, found greater resistance.  “For my first month on the job, there was a parade of agents from my office to my supervisor’s office: ‘Can’t we have a man prosecutor?’ . . . Over the years I got a lot of satisfaction out of seeing the agents come to prefer women prosecutors.  They would come to me when I was a supervisor and say ‘We find that the women take these cases so much more seriously.  They’re willing to work much harder and longer and they don’t pooh-pooh a case as not being significant’” (Yates and Goldberg 18).

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